Division Staff Resources

2016 Student Affairs Assessment Series

At IUPUI, assessment is something that is at the very core of our work. We use assessment to understand what we do, how we do it, how well we do it, and how to improve it and ourselves. Student affairs professionals have a great deal to offer in the realm of assessment, and this series is designed to develop, enhance, and hone the skills necessary to perform assessment.

The 2016 Student Affairs Assessment Series comprises seven sessions offered in no particular order. Staff can opt to attend one, some, all, or none of the sessions based on their interest and as their schedules allow. All sessions will be held from 12:00-1:00 in University Hall 1006, and attendees are more than welcome to bring their lunches to the session. Resources from each session will be made available after each meeting. The dates of the sessions are as follows; descriptions of each session can be found below. Please register for the session(s) you plan on attending.

Wednesday, January 13 Tuesday, April 12
Wednesday, February 3 Wednesday, May 4
Wednesday, February 24 Wednesday, May 25
Tuesday, March 22
  • Assessment 101: The Basics

    Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    This session will be a high-level overview of what assessment is and how we communicate about it.

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this session, participants will:

      • Define common terms
      • Describe the parts of the assessment cycle
      • Compare/contrast different forms of assessment
      • Compare/contrast different methods of assessment
      • Articulate the context of assessment at IUPUI and the Division
  • Assessment in Student Affairs: Why it Matters

    Wednesday, February 3, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    This session is a stand-alone session, but will pick up where Assessment 101: The Basics leaves off. The discussion will focus on the assessment cycle, the rationale behind using assessment, and opportunities to enhance practice and policy through assessment.

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this session, participants will:

      • Define the basic components of assessment
      • Describe the parts of the assessment cycle
      • Articulate why assessment is important
      • Identify opportunities to enhance or conduct assessment in their respective functional areas
  • Getting at the PCLs: Assessing Student Learning in Student Affairs

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    The Division of Student Affairs at IUPUI uses the Principles of Co-Curricular Learning (PCLs) as the basis for its programming and assessment. This session will focus on ways to ensure that programs and services offered to the IUPUI community can be assessed in ways that can demonstrate the skills and knowledge as they relate to the PCLs. Learning objectives and outcomes, indirect and direct methods of assessment, and other pertinent topics will be discussed.

     Learning Objectives

     After attending this session, participants will

      • Differentiate between program outcomes and student learning outcomes
      • Define student learning objectives
      • Define program/process outcomes
      • Write measurable learning objectives
      • Compare and contrast direct and indirect assessment methods
  • You want me to answer how many questions?: Creating high-quality surveys

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    While surveys can meet the needs of some assessments, they are not the only way to gather data. This session will describe several other methods for collecting usable and high-quality data.

    Guest presenter: Anne Mitchell, Director, Survey Research, Institutional Research and Decision Support

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this session, participants will:

      • Create basic survey questions
      • Describe good practices in survey design
      • Articulate when not to use a survey
      • Identify ways of increasing response rates
  • Beyond the survey: Other means of assessment

    Tuesday, April 12, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    While surveys can meet the needs of some assessments, they are not the only way to gather data. This session will describe several other methods for collecting usable and high-quality data.

     Learning Objectives

     After attending this session, participants will

      • Describe methods of assessment other than surveys
      • Articulate appropriate venues for different assessment methods.
      • Identify programs or services in their respective units where non-survey methods might be appropriate
  • So we have data. Now what?: Using Assessment Results

    Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    Assessment is only a worthwhile task so long as we intend to do something with the results - and can implement processes in a similar manner over time. However, what to do with the results is not always clear. This session will focus on obtaining and using data meaningfully, documenting policy and procedures, securing data, and communicating outcomes to various constituencies.

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this session, participants will:

      • Apply the ASK (Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge; ACPA) standards to:
        • Apply results to improve programs and services
        • Discover and question assumptions about current practices
        • Seek to effect change using assessment results
      • Document assessment processes for historical and replication purposes
      • Identify ways to secure data
      • Articulate different tools available to them for assessment
      • Communicate outcomes to stakeholders and other interested parties
  • Words in a Box does not a Rubric Make: Developing Usable Rubrics

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016, 12:00-1:00, University Hall 1006

    Rubrics are excellent ways to ensure consistent scoring of behaviors or assessing artifacts. However, they can be difficult to write so that they are meaningful and useful to both the person doing the scoring and the person being assessed. This session will focus on how to create rubrics in ways that will result in a tool that can be utilized to assess programs and services.

     Learning Objectives

     After attending this session, participants will

    • Articulate the purpose of a rubric
    • Compare and contrast well- and poorly-written rubrics
    • Develop a simple rubric

Click here for a printable version of the session descriptions.

Please register for the session(s) you plan on attending.

For more information on this series, or to request more information on one of these or another assessment-related topic, please contact Dr. Matthew D. Pistilli, Director of Assessment and Planning for the IUPUI Division of Student Affairs, at mpistill@iupui.edu or 317-274-8990.