Health & Wellness Promotion

Nutrition
Dietitian's Dish FAQ
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IUPUI students, staff and faculty have submitted questions to the Dietitian's Dish. Below you will find the common questions and each of their responses. All identifying information has been removed from the question. 

Iodine Essentials for Hoosiers

  • Why is iodine important to Indiana Hoosiers?

    Individuals living in Great Lake States including Indiana need iodine. The amount of iodine in the soil is so low that at one time the Great Lakes states were known as the “goiter belt”. Goiters are enlarged thyroid glands that give the neck a swollen appearance. The goiter problem was observed during World War I by Army physicians. To address this major public health crisis, in 1924, iodine was added to table salt first in Michigan and later across the country making iodized salt the first functional food. Within 10 years, the percentage of people in Michigan with goiter fell from about 30% to under 2%.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Could I be at risk for an iodine deficiency?

    Individuals who do not get enough iodine in their diet are at risk for underactive thyroid and goiters. Symptoms can include memory and cognition problems, decreased alertness, dry skin and hair, and unplanned weight gain. Some foods contain goitrogens that interfere with iodine uptake into the thyroid gland and production of thyroid hormones. A partial list of goitrogenic foods includes sweet potatoes, Brussel sprouts, kale, rutabaga and soy. Cooking destroys goitrogenic compounds.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • How much iodine do we need each day? Can Hoosiers get enough iodine from food?

    To prevent an iodine deficiency, the RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) for males and females aged 14 and older is 150 micrograms iodine/day. For pregnant women, iodine requirement increases to 220 micrograms/day and for those nursing, 290 micrograms/day is needed.  The preferred abbreviation for microgram is mcg even though ug is sometimes used.

    Can Hoosiers get enough iodine from food?

    No; It is extremely difficult for Hoosiers to get enough iodine from food alone especially if one is eating local as the Indiana soil is deficit in iodine.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • What is the best source of iodine in the Hoosier diet?

    Iodized salt is the primary and best source of iodine in the diet for most Americans. Sea salts, kosher salts and salts used in most fast foods and processed foods do not contain iodine. Iodine is no longer used in the production of commercial breads. The best food sources of iodine are marine vegetables and fish as they concentrate iodine from sea water. Eggs, cow’s milk and yogurt continue to be good sources of iodine. Milk alternative beverages are poor sources of iodine.

    Can Hoosiers get enough iodine from food?

    No; It is extremely difficult for Hoosiers to get enough iodine from food alone especially if one is eating local as the Indiana soil is deficit in iodine.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

     

  • Which salt should I use? Iodized or non-iodized salt?

    IODIZED! In the United States, in 1924, iodine was added to salt. The use of iodized salt is a worldwide strategy to combat iodine deficiency. The USA FDA approved potassium iodide and cuprous iodine for salt iodization. Iodized salt contains approximately 45 mcg iodine per gram of salt.  In theory, men and women (19-70 years old) can meet their iodine requirement with 2/3 teaspoon (~4 grams) of iodized salt. This is equivalent to 1550 mg sodium which is close to the American Heart Association recommendation to eat no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day.

     

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Are there any folks who should not use iodized salt?

    Individuals with thyroid problems, such as hyperthyroidism or autoimmune thyroid disease, should monitor their iodine intake. Consuming too much iodine can block thyroid hormone synthesis, increasing thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) leading to goiter. People taking anti-thyroid medications and ACE inhibitors should discuss their iodine intake with their doctor to avoid harmful interactions.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Do pregnant and nursing moms need more iodine than others?

    YES! Pregnant women need 220 mcg iodine daily and nursing moms 290 mcg. Iodine deficiency remains the leading cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. Deficiency in iodine during pregnancy can cause neural tube defects, spina bifida, and irreversible cognitive and neurological impairment of the fetus. Iodide in prenatal vitamin-mineral supplements is essential to support the growth and development of the fetal brain and mom’s thyroid hormones. Infants need an estimated 110 - 130 mcg iodine daily. Untreated hypothyroidism in infancy causes permanent effects on the brain and can affect cognitive development throughout life.

    Sources:

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Is the paleo diet really bad for you or is it ok to use?

    Dear Paleo Fan,

    I’m so glad you asked this question because there is so much confusion about this eating style.  The Paleo Diet - also known as the “caveman diet” - has made headlines for years.  With promotional taglines like Eat like your ancestors, most readers are puzzled at what that even means.  I would think that my ancestors would not skip out on froyo if they had the opportunity!

    In a nutshell, the Paleo Diet encourages eating meat, nuts, eggs, vegetables, and fruits; while avoiding grains, dairy, tubers, legumes, salt, sugar, processed foods, and alcohol.  I certainly agree that limiting alcohol and processed foods may be beneficial, but eliminating entire food groups can put you at risk for nutrient deficiencies.  

    Dairy products provide protein, calcium, potassium, iodine, Vitamin D, and phosphorous, while whole grain foods are a great source for carbohydrates, fiber, B vitamins, folate, iron, magnesium, and selenium.  Without these nutrients, you would experience deficiencies which could lead to nutritional challenges.  According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the Paleo Diet needs further research to fully understand the effects.  However, I do want to say that the Paleo diet could be beneficial for a person who has avoided eating nuts, fruits and vegetables.

    If you so choose to pursue the Paleo Diet, consider making an appointment with a dietitian to discuss nutritional supplements you might need offset any potential nutrient deficiencies.  Just remember that the best diet for success is well-rounded and balanced, and is individualized for you.

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Some of my girlfriends before spring break, go on a “water diet” where you eat once a day and drink water the rest of the day. Is that a good way to lose weight?

    Dear Diet Seeker,

    Getting into shape for beach season is a popular theme, and there is nothing wrong with wanting to improve your health and body image!  With that being said, it is also really great to see that you are researching fad diets before jumping right in.  Ultimately, the answer to your question is no, the water diet is not a healthy way to lose weight. 

    While the body can survive quite a while on water alone, it is not recommended.  When the body is deprived of energy (food) it goes into survival mode and will hack into its energy reserves.  After just one day without enough food to refuel, the body will use up all its carbohydrates stored as glycogen in your liver and muscle cells (there goes your energy!).  After the carbs are gone, the body will look to fats. The average person has enough fat reserves to last about 4-6 weeks with no food. After that, the body switches to protein.  With that being said, once you revert back to your normal eating habits, you will quickly gain back all the weight that you worked so hard to lose.

    Cutting back on calories is a much healthier option for weight loss. It takes a reduction of 500 calories each day to lose 1lb in a week.  By choosing to make 20% of your calories from protein, 35% from fat and the rest from carbohydrates, you provide your body with enough energy, vitamins, and minerals.

    Water is crucial to your health and will aid your effort to lose weight. In fact, substituting water for another liquid in your diet, such as soda, is a great way to cut calories.  You should plan to drink 8 cups of fluid a day. This includes all sources of water—from a basic glass of water, to a cup of coffee, to the water within the foods you eat.  Combining water with the right amount of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins will make all the difference for you!  Overall, fad diets that promise quick and substantial weight loss are detrimental to your health, and will only make losing weight even more difficult.   

    My best advice for healthy weight loss is daily exercise and eat well, and your body will thank you for that!  When you start making these positive changes, you may feel some resistance. But once you are in the habit of making healthy choices you will begin to CRAVE your new lifestyle. 

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • I heard eating fruits and fruit juices are bad for you because they are so high sugar. Is that true?

    Dear Concerned Fruit Eater,

    What an interesting and complex question!  We are constantly bombarded with conflicting data about fruit and sugar content, so I applaud you for doing your research.

    Fruits are a necessary part of a healthy well-balanced diet, and it is recommended that adults get 1 ½ -2 cups of fruit a day.  Fruits, like many other foods, contain natural sugars that the body can easily break down for energy. They are also rich in vitamins and minerals – such as potassium, folate, vitamin C, and fiber - some of which are under consumed in general.  Fiber is crucial for proper bowel functioning and can also help lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of heart disease.  Potassium has been shown to help maintain a healthy blood pressure.  Folate reduces the risk of neural tube defects in fetal development and helps with the red blood cell production.  Vitamin C is important for your skin, teeth, gums, and wound healing.  People with vitamin C deficiencies are also at risk of getting scurvy.  Did you know that there have been 35 documented cases of scurvy in the IU health system?  So be sure you are getting your vitamin C!

    You asked if eating fruits and drinking fruit juices was bad for you because of the sugar content – essentially the answer is no because the nutrient profile in fruits outweighs the fructose sugar.  So remember to be sure you are getting either fruit or fruit juices every day to help keep your body healthy.  

    When it comes to fruit juice MyPlate recommends that you consume 100% fruit juice because it does not have added sugar in it, but if you are still concerned or confused you can check the Nutrition Facts Label to determine the sugar content.  Great resources are available at the USDA’s website Choosemyplate.gov

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Are juice fasts a good idea?

    Dear Juicer,

    Juicing is such a popular trend in the nutrition industry, so it’s great that you’re wondering if juice fasts really work! In general, juice fasting includes just vegetable and fruit juices plus water for a few days or weeks.  

    A juicing machine removes the majority of fiber from the vegetables and fruit. Fiber helps make you feel full and is considered the “body’s broom” because fiber passes through your stomach, small intestine and colon without being digested.  There are two types of fiber: the first is soluble fiber and when dissolved in water, creates a gel-like substance that can help reduce elevated cholesterol and glucose levels.  The second is insoluble fiber and that one plays the role in promoting normal bowel function.  Fiber in the diet is the preferred fuel of the gut microbiota.

    Juice fasts provide very little protein as lean meat, beans, and legumes are excluded.  Protein is a macronutrient that our bodies require to maintain muscle strength and tone for normal functioning. Unlike fats and carbohydrates, which are also macronutrients, the body does not store protein. The body needs a daily protein supply.  For these reasons, it is important to consume an adequate amount of protein for muscular growth and development.  Reducing protein intake through juicing is not a healthy option because instead of losing fat, you will end up losing muscle.

    Those who decide to go on a juice fast think it is an easy weight loss method or to detox the body. While you may see initial weight loss on a juice fast - mostly due to reduced energy- the weight will come back with a vengeance when solid foods are reintroduced. Not only are juice fasts ineffective for weight loss, they are nutritionally incomplete. If used over time, juice fasts can lead to nutrient deficiencies. Science has shown no evidence that juicing will cleanse the body as the body has a natural detoxification system that is dependent on the liver and kidneys.  Just remember my rule of thumb - losing weight is not an overnight process.  Effective weight loss strategies requires a healthy well-balanced diet and regular exercise to reach that goal.

    For more information on juicing, check out the USDA’s Q&A link from myplate.gov on Juicing Nutrition Tips.

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Will eating after 8 p.m. make me gain weight?

    Dear Midnight Snacker,

    What a great question! We all read so many misconceptions about metabolism and the timing of eating, and one of those is that eating late at night will cause weight gain.  

    Eating after 8pm will not necessarily lead to weight gain. However, if you have already consumed your allotment of Calories for the day, then you could experience weight gain as you are eating too much for you.  An average diet provides approximately 2,000 calories. You can calculate your own personal daily energy needs by using this calculator tool.  Studies show that subjects who consumed 15% or more of their total daily energy between the hours of 11pm and 5 am were more likely to eat more and gain weight versus subjects who did not eat during that time. 

    So if you feel hungry during the evening and have not have consumed all of your daily calories, feel free to have a healthy snack.  A few good snack options are:

    • Small apple with 1 tbsp. of peanut butter
    • Granola bar
    • Whole grain cereal with milk
    • Yogurt

    Just remember, there’s no right way or time to eat. Everyone is different. Find what works for you as an individual. Eat right and sleep tight!

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Is it true that you gain more weight when you eat after 8pm?​

    Dear Night Eater,

    Eating after 8pm does not necessarily lead to weight gain. However, if you have already consumed your allotment of Calories for the day, then you could experience weight gain as you are eating too much for you. Studies show that people who consumed 15% or more of their total daily endergy between the hours of 11pm and 5am were more likely to eat more and gain weight, versus people who did not eat during that time. 

     An average diet provides approximately 2,000 calories. You can calculate your own personal daily energy needs at https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/.  

    So if you feel hungry during the evening and have not have consumed all of your daily calories, feel free to have a healthy snack.  A few good snack options are:

    • Small apple with 1 tbsp. of peanut butter
    • Granola bar 
    • Whole grain cereal with milk
    •  Yogurt

    Just remember, there’s no right way or time to eat. Everyone is different. Find what works for you as an individual. Eat right and sleep tight! 

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • How does ginger benefit you?

    Dear Ginger Enthusiast,

    This is one of my favorite topics because most people have no idea how incredible this little root is!  Ginger comes from a flowering plant and is recognized as a superfood because of its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.  It has a very spicy flavor and is beneficial for digestion, nausea, pain, loss of appetite, and relieving asthma symptoms.  Ginger is also known to relieve joint or muscle soreness and can reduce the progression of exercise or injury pain.  If you suffer from heartburn or acid reflux disease, you may want to start incorporating ginger into your diet.

    It is very easy to add ginger to your diet.  You can add raw ginger to smoothies, soups, or stir-fry.  You can even try steeping raw ginger slices in boiling water to make ginger tea. Raw ginger can be expensive, so you could also use powder in your recipes.  Ginger products are available at most grocery or health food stores.  

    Ginger Tea Recipe:

    • 4-6 slices raw ginger (more or less depending on the strength you’d like)
    • 2 cups water
    • 1-2 Tbsp honey (optional)

    Peel the ginger and slice thinly to help with steeping.  Boil the ginger in water for at least 10 minutes, you can boil for 20 for a stronger flavor. Remove from heat and add honey to taste.

    I definitely recommend adding ginger to your diet.  It can be a positive addition into your healthy lifestyle.  

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Is it true that pasta and bread are bad for you?

    Dear Health Conscious,  

    This is such an important topic!  You can’t surf the internet today without getting contradictory advice on this subject, and it’s so difficult to know what is true or false.

    Basically, pasta and breads are derived from grains, a necessary food group providing carbohydrates which is a main source of energy for the body.  Grains are also an essential part of a well-balanced diet. There are 2 types - whole grain and refined grain (white grain).

    Whole Grain vs. White Grain

    Source from: http://skinnychef.com/blog/whole-grains-for-kids

    White grain, which has been processed to remove the bran layer and germ, provides energy and some protein. While unprocessed whole grain provides fiber, zinc, iron, manganese, folate, magnesium, copper, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, phosphorus, selenium, riboflavin, and vitamin A in addition to energy and protein. 

    From a diet perspective, it is much better to choose pasta and breads made with whole grains.  We have found that consuming whole grains as a part of a healthy diet may reduce the risk of disease, promotes a healthy digestive system, and may also help control weight. 

    There are several types of whole grain food items that you can incorporate into your diet, which include brown rice, oats, popcorn, quinoa, whole grain cereal, whole wheat crackers, etc. Most of these products can be found at your neighborhood supermarket.

    The USDA’s ChooseMyPlate (https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ recommends 6 oz. of grains for a person who is on a 2000 calorie diet. A slice of bread or ½ cup of brown rice are considered one ounce of grain. 

    Cup and Ounce Equivalents

    Try to make your meals look like this:

     MyPlate

    You can also use online databases such as MyFitnessPal to track your intake in each food group and total calories. MyFitnessPal even has a mobile app to make things easier!

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • How do artificial ingredients effect your body?

    Dear Inquisitive Student,

    This is a complicated answer. Some artificial ingredients are added back to prevent a nutritional deficiency condition. For example, the soil in the MidWest are deplete in iodine. To prevent iodine deficiency Salt in the Midwest is iodized. Unfortunately many folks in Indiana do not use iodize salt. If Moms have low iodine intake during pregnancy it can lead to impaired mental function in the infant. There is a permanent lifelong impairment.

    A reference for you is Leung's Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients: Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics (3rd edition). Please write back let me know what artificial ingredient is of interest you and I will gladly respond.​

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • Are there certain foods that decrease inflammation, especially inflammation caused by athletic injuries?

    Dear Reader,

    It’s great to see you are interested in foods that decrease inflammation! Inflammation can be pesky especially when it’s caused by an injury, but there are many foods that are proven to decrease inflammation, so you’re in luck! Berries are a great source of antioxidants, which can help prevent oxidative stress and minimize inflammation. Many studies have proven that the consumption of berries can help to prevent delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that can occur from exercise.

    • Fruits most effective in reducing inflammation:
    • Blueberries
    • Raspberries
    • Dark cherries
    • Pomegranates
    • Vegetables most effective in reducing inflammation:
    • Spinach
    • Ginger
    • Garlic
    • Broccoli
    • Sweet Potatoes

    These fruits and vegetables have been shown to be the most effective to reduce inflammation and prevent DOMS and other athletic injuries. Any dark or bright fruit or vegetable is going to have something called phytochemicals, which can prevent oxidative stress on the body. Oxidative stress is physiological stress on the body that is caused by the cumulative damage done by free radicals (which are not good!) inadequately neutralized by antioxidants and that is held to be associated with aging. You definitely don’t want that with being an athlete, so eat your fruits and veggies!

    Another great food source that can help decrease and prevent inflammation is fish. Many fish contain omega-3 fatty acids, which have anti-inflammatory properties. Omega-3 fatty acids will fight those free radicals I was talking about earlier! Tuna, salmon, sardines, and mackerel are all good sources of omega-3 and you can also find them in supplements available at grocery and health food stores.

    Some herbs and spices can even help to decrease and even prevent inflammation. These include cloves, rosemary, turmeric, and ginger. You can find these items, dried or fresh, at grocery stores and are a wonderful tool for reducing inflammation. Add them to your food, smoothies/juices, and meals for an extra added flavor and health benefits.

    • Anti-Inflammatory Smoothie
    • 1 cup frozen mixed berries (blueberries, raspberries, cherries)
    • 1 cup baby spinach
    • 1 inch fresh ginger
    • ½ cup tart cherry juice

    Throw it all in a blender with some ice, and you are good to go!

    Being an athlete can be hard on the body and a proper diet with anti-inflammatory foods is essential for optimal performance. I hope this helps and gives you some insight on how to control inflammation. Good luck!

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • I am planning to start a diet pretty soon but I do not know exactly what is the proper way to lose weight?

    Dear Health Nut,

    It is great to see that you are interested in a healthier lifestyle!  As you begin your journey, there are some well-researched recommendations to consider. According to the Centers for Disease Control, a healthy approach is to lose weight slowly - about 1-2 lbs. per week.  One pound of body weight represents 3500 Calories, which means that you need to cut or burn 3500 Calories over a 7 day period to lose weight.  This can seem like a daunting task, but a combination of both exercise and calorie restriction is definitely reasonable!  In fact, research has shown that diet and exercise together is the most effective method for sustained weight loss. With that in mind, here are some great ways to eliminate those Calories:

    • Walking or running 1 mile to burn 100 Calories
    • Bike at a moderate pace for 15 minutes to burn 100 Calories
    • Work in your garden for 25 minutes to burn 100 Calories
    • Drink water instead of soda to save 130 Calories
    • Swap your 12oz glass of whole milk for skim milk to save 90 Calories

    For more tips on easy ways to cut Calories visit the EatRight website.

    It is usually best to eat at least 1200 Calories a day and to include the essential nutrients.  A great tool to help you track your daily energy intake are the phone app MyFitnesspal and the websites Supertracker.usda.gov, and ChooseMyPlate.org.  You can input enter in food you eat and exercise you do each day to track Syour goals.

    Just remember that everyone is different, so what works for one person may not work for another! I’m certain you will find the best formula of success for you!

    To your health and wellbeing,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!

  • I am trying to gain as much muscle as I can. What foods should I eat more of? Eat less of?

    Dear Muscle Builder,

    It takes a while to gain muscle mass even under ideal conditions. A realistic expectation is 1-2 pounds of muscle gain in a month. Here are key components; get enough sleep so the body can build body proteins. Start a regular strength training program that works for you. Eat a good quality diet includes proteins, fruits, vegetables, dairy foods, whole grain and fats; use the Choosemyplate website to help. Use Supertracker to help plan, analyze, and track your diet and physical activity. A glass of milk is a good after workout food choice, others can be found on Stronglifts' website

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health​

     
  • Is there a Registered Dietitian on Campus that one could come talk to about any questions or concerns one might have about their eating habits and health habits?

    Dear Inquisitive Student,

    Right now IUPUI does not have a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) on campus to answer personal or individualize nutrition questions.

    You can enroll in undergraduate nutrition courses this spring 2017;  SHRS-ND 265 Nutrition and Exercise or HPER-N Nutrition for Health to learn more. You can also participate in a new undergraduate 12 credit Nutrition Certificate to increase your knowledge and application of nutrition principles to your life. Another possibility is to work with a RDN in private practice who can individualize an eating plan for you. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist” online referral service allows you to search a national database of Academy members for the exclusive purpose of finding a qualified registered dietitian nutritionist or food and nutrition practitioner who is right for you. You can search by zip code or nutrition specialty.   

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health!​

  • What are doing to have a dietitian to working in HWP?

    Dear Engaged Student,

    Right now IUPUI does not have a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) on campus to answer personal or individualize nutrition questions. Proposal have been submitted and there does not seem do-able within the current university budget.

    In the meantime, you can enroll in undergraduate nutrition courses. SHRS-ND 265 Nutrition and Exercise or HPER-N Nutrition for Health to learn more. You can also participate in a new undergraduate 12 credit Nutrition Certificate to increase your knowledge and application of nutrition principles to your life.

    Another possibility is to work with a RDN in private practice who can individualize an eating plan for you. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist” online referral service allows you to search a national database of Academy members for the exclusive purpose of finding a qualified registered dietitian nutritionist or food and nutrition practitioner who is right for you. You can search by zip code or nutrition specialty.   

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health​

  • As an IUPUI student I would really like to see the Health Department a bit more active on campus. Is there any conversation about holding events and/or informative gatherings on campus in the near future? What about employing a Campus Dietitian? Someone who could almost walk us through healthy eating and living, with all the space in campus center posting meal ideas, new and interesting health facts and health do's and don'ts around the eating area would be very helpful, has the Department of Nutrition & Dietetics considered any of this?

    Dear Engaged Student,

    What a great ideas! What we eat in the short and as well as the long term supports our health now and into the future. It is well recognized that eating well delays or prevents chronic diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, renal disease and diabetes.

    Right now IUPUI does not have a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) on campus to answer personal or individualize nutrition questions. 

    You can enroll in undergraduate nutrition courses. SHRS-ND 265 Nutrition and Exercise or HPER-N Nutrition for Health to learn more. You can also participate in a new undergraduate 12 credit Nutrition Certificate to increase your knowledge and application of nutrition principles to your life. Another possibility is to work with a RDN in private practice who can individualize an eating plan for you. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist” online referral service allows you to search a national database of Academy members for the exclusive purpose of finding a qualified registered dietitian nutritionist or food and nutrition practitioner who is right for you. You can search by zip code or nutrition specialty.

    To your health,

    D.D.

    Eat well, rest well, get moving, and enjoy good health​

      "Dietitian's Dish" is intended for informational and educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical care or to apply to individuals with special medical needs. We do not provide any medical diagnoses, individualized assessments, health counseling, or medical opinions. Please do not send personal health information of any kind as it will be deleted immediately. Please note that we are required to make mandatory reports to the proper authority when certain events occur, such as abuse. We also have the professional obligation to notify appropriate third parties and/or authorities when a clear threat of harm is made by a client to another identifiable individual or group or to themselves.