Leadership Development and Civic Engagement

Alternative Break Programs
Trip Names and Descriptions for 2017 Alternative Spring Break Trips

Social issues for 2017 Alternative Spring Break (ASB) Trips:

  1. Animal Welfare    
  2. Environmentalism    
  3. HIV/AIDS    
  4. Indigenous Rights    
  5. Interfaith    
  6. Mental Health    
  7. Rural Poverty    
  8. Systemic Racism, with a focus on gentrification & food deserts

Trip Names and Descriptions:

1. Animal Welfare

Where the Wild Things Are

Take a paws from everyday life to gopher a trip with us on our toadally awesome, not at all hawkward, animal welfare alternative break! Gain a deeper understanding of animal welfare in the context of rescue, rehabilitation, captive and wild settings. The hands-on animal care and exposure to conservation practices will offer you a chance to analyze animal welfare in action.

2. Environmentalism

Do You Enjoy Sunsets and Long Walks on the Beach?

If so, join us on our trip! We will be focusing on the issue of environment, specifically the ocean and the coastal habitats around them. Not only will we focus on certain issues that affect the life in the oceans, but also marshes and rivers along the coast and human impact on these communities. If you are interested in exploring these environmental topics, delving into current issues around the US, and wanting to learn how to help, come along with us on our alternative adventure!

3. HIV/AIDS

Bad Blood? Fighting Misinformation and Overcoming Stigma about HIV/AIDS

Once a mysterious disease thought to be infecting gay men in California and New York, HIV/AIDS has caused immense levels of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although AIDS is no longer a death sentence because of medical breakthroughs in treatment and prevention, HIV/AIDS has continued to spread due in large part to social factors apparent throughout the history of HIV/AIDS. This trip will explore the social factors, inequalities, misinformation, and stigma associated with HIV/AIDS.

4. Indigenous Peoples' Rights

The Stories We Tell  

What does it mean to keep a culture alive? This particular trip will explore different indigenous cultures from around the world and the barriers to keeping a culture alive in today’s society. Participants will learn more about some of the history and the current policies that affect indigenous peoples. We will take a critical look at the stories that have defined our country’s past and current actions in regards to historically oppressed groups. Our service work will be done in solidarity with other nonprofit organizations seeking to advance indigenous rights here in the United States.

5. Interfaith

Being Human Together  

As religious world tensions mount, hate crimes, hate speech, and bigoted rhetoric have become commonplace in American society. On this Alternative Break, you’ll learn about different religious traditions and the experiences of members of those traditions in America. You’ll have the opportunity to combat the growing religious phobias, specifically Islamophobia, that have infiltrated our national dialogue through open, interfaith discourse and service. Finally, you’ll be reminded, and be able to remind others, that we are all citizens of the world regardless of our faith and that, because of this, we all have our humanity in common.

6. Mental Health

When Your Struggle Becomes Your Identity: Exploring the State of Mental Health  

Come spend your spring break learning and discussing mental health and all of the ways it affects the lives of individuals and communities as a whole. From language to health care policy, mental health plays an enormous role in all of our lives, whether we’re conscious of it or not. On this trip, we will be working together in order to break down the stigma associated with mental health in Indianapolis and the community of our surprise location.

7. Rural Poverty

#RuralTalk

When you think about poverty in America, what do you imagine? News and media often lead us to believe that poverty only occurs in urban areas, but the rate of people experiencing poverty in rural areas is 8% higher than in metropolitan cities. While urban areas have some access to social initiatives for people experiencing poverty, rural communities don’t have as many. We must consider: how does a place so rich in land have such a scarcity of resources? This AB trip will plunge into the issue of poverty in rural America and in that, explore the challenges that accompany it.

8. Systemic Racism: focusing on gentrification & food deserts

In the System We Trust

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect system, must expect justice within our gentrifying neighborhoods, ensure social tranquility, provide food security, and promote equity and equality for all. Explore with us the multiple faces of what many call "systemic racism": the practices, and structures that perpetuate the very people our constitution promises to protect. Our trip will be taking an intersectional approach to systemic racism, focusing on gentrification and food security.